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Building With Safety: Your Guide to Construction Job Site Safety

Construction Job Site Safety

Workers in the construction industry are exposed to significant risks daily, increasing the likelihood of accidents on job sites. The statistics are alarming; according to procore.com, since 2008, the construction industry has experienced more total fatalities than any other sector. 

Furthermore, additional data from procore.com reveals that in 2021 alone, there were 169,200 recorded injuries in the construction industry. In the face of these dangers, gearing up with above-the-shoulder safety products isn’t just a matter of compliance – it’s a crucial investment in worker safety.

Understanding Above-the-Shoulder Products

Above-the-shoulder products mitigate workers’ risks, particularly in high-risk environments like construction sites. This specialized protective gear encompasses a range of items, including eyewear, head protection, bandanas, neck shades, and respirators. Learn more about each type below:

  1. Eye Wear: Eye protection is one of the most crucial above-the-shoulder PPE. Construction sites are filled with flying debris, dust, and other hazards that can cause serious eye injuries. Safety glasses, goggles, and face shields are essential for shielding the eyes from harm.
  2. Head Protection: Hard hats are iconic symbols of construction safety. They protect workers from falling objects, bumps, and electrical hazards. Choosing the correct type of hard hat for your job is crucial to ensure optimal protection and compliance with safety regulations.
  3. Bandanas: Bandanas serve multiple functions as safety gear. Worn around the neck, they protect against dust, sun exposure, and other environmental factors. They can also be worn over the face for added protection. Bandanas also help absorb sweat, improving visibility and comfort on the job site.
  4. Neck Shades: Neck shades are specialized accessories that protect the neck and lower face from sun exposure and other hazards. They offer added comfort and protection, particularly in hot and sunny conditions. Liberty Safety neck shades are available for Hi-Vis Full-Brim and Cap-Style hard hats, and come in chemically treated FR options. 
  5. Respirators: In environments where air quality may be compromised, respirators play a pivotal role in protecting workers from harmful airborne contaminants. Various types are available, including disposable masks and reusable respirators. Selecting the appropriate respirator is essential for ensuring respiratory health and safety on the job.

Construction Safety Week

Construction Safety Week is an annual event that aims to raise awareness about job site safety and foster a culture of safety among workers, contractors, and companies in the construction industry. This year, Construction Safety Week was observed from May 6th – 10th, with each day dedicated to a specific topic and accompanied by toolbox talks:

  • May 6th: Driving Personal Ownership
  • May 7th: Encourage and Welcome New Ideas
  • May 8th: Embracing Every Voice
  • May 9th: Strengthen Our Culture
  • May 10th: Thank You for Using Your Voice

Let’s join hands in spreading awareness for #constructionsafetyweek and enhancing job site safety. Share this post with a friend!

Choosing the Right Above-the-Shoulder PPE for the Job

When selecting the right Above-the-Shoulder PPE for the job site, it’s crucial to assess the work environment and its potential hazards.

For personalized guidance and support, contact a Liberty Safety Representative to connect with one of our product experts and ensure workforce safety.

For more Construction Head-To-Toe PPE, download our Construction Segment Catalog

May Product Promo

Elevate workforce safety with our May Product Promo. Explore our selection of Above-the-Shoulder Products designed to elevate safety standards in the workplace.

Conclusion

In alignment with Construction Safety Week, let’s unite to embrace the importance of safety on construction job sites. Investing in high-quality, Above-the-Shoulder products protects workers from injury and fosters a safer, more productive work environment for everyone. 

Your safety is our priority. It’s all part of our freedom in full gear promise.

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Staying Visible: Prioritizing Safety in Hazardous Work Environments

Staying Visible

Working near roadways and heavy machinery poses significant risks to workers, increasing the likelihood of accidents involving moving objects. The statistics are alarming; according to the CDC, roadway construction sites see an average of 123 worker fatalities annually. In 2019 alone, there were 762 fatal crashes resulting in 842 deaths. (ohsonline.com)

Furthermore, data from the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) reveals that 1 in 4 “struck-by” fatalities involve construction workers, more than any other occupation. In the face of these dangers, gearing up with high-visibility safety apparel is essential. It’s not just a piece of clothing; it’s a lifeline that can ensure the well-being of workers on the job.

Understanding High-Visibility Safety Apparel (HVSA)

High-visibility safety apparel (HVSA) is pivotal in mitigating risks for workers, particularly in low-light or dark conditions. This specialized protective gear, including jackets, pants, vests, and sweatshirts, is designed to enhance visibility and reduce the likelihood of accidents. HVSA incorporates reflective and fluorescent materials, making workers more conspicuous to motorists and equipment operators.

Reflective materials, a key component of HVSA, work by redirecting light back to its source. This property makes them particularly effective in low-light conditions, as they bounce back light from headlights or other light sources, making the wearer more visible. On the other hand, fluorescent materials in HVSA rely on bright light, functioning optimally when there is a source of sunlight. Fluorescent HVSA is most effective in bright light conditions.

HVSA is widely used in various work environments, including construction sites, warehouses, maintenance facilities, and traffic zones. Equipping your team with HVSA ensures their safety and well-being amidst hazardous work conditions.

Understanding the ANSI/ISEA 107-2020 Standard

The American National Standard for High-Visibility Safety Apparel and Accessories (ANSI/ISEA 107-2020) is the latest edition of the industry consensus standard governing High-Visibility Safety Apparel (HVSA) in occupational environments. Since its inception in 1999, this standard has been the authoritative guide for the design, performance, and materials of high-visibility PPE in the United States. It has been codified into the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) regulations, and referenced in other worker protection standards.

ANSI/ISEA 107-2020 maintains a Type-Performance Class designation for garments, with the Type based on the expected use setting and the Performance Class identified by the finished garment’s visible materials and design attributes. Understanding these classifications is vital for ensuring compliance and selecting the appropriate HVSA for specific work environments.

The standard outlines four garment performance classes:

  • Class 1
  • Class 2
  • Class 3
  • Class E

And three Garment Types based on expected Work Environments:

  • Type O (“Off Road”) – Type O HVSA is a performance class 1
  • Type R (“Roadway”) – Type R HVSA may be performance class 2 or 3
  • Type P (“Public Safety/First Responders”) – Type P HVSA may be performance class 2 or 3

The chart below details each garment type and performance class, specifying the minimum areas for background material, retroreflective or combined performance materials, and the minimum reflective material width.

Garment TypePerformance ClassBackground MaterialRetroreflective or Combined Performance MaterialsMinimum Width Reflective Material
Type O Off-road and Non-Roadway UseClass 1217 in²155 in²1 in.
Type R
Roadway and Temporary Traffic Control Zones
 
Class 2  775 in²*201 in²1.38 in.
1″ split trim designs
Class 31240 in²**310 in²2 in.
1″ split trim designs
Type P
Emergency and Incident Responders and Law Enforcement Personnel
Class 2  450 in.²201 in²2 in.
1″ split trim designs
Class 3775 in²310 in²2 in.
1″ split trim designs
Supplemental Items
Pants, Overalls, Shorts, Rain Pants and Gaiters
Class E465 in²109 in²2 in.
1″ split trim designs
  *To accommodate small workers, the smallest size offered in Type R, Class 2, may use a minimum of 0.35m² (540 in²) of background material. Subsequent larger sizes must use 0.50 m² (775 in²). **To accommodate small workers, the smallest size offered in Type R, Class 3, may use a minimum of 0.65 m² (1,000 in²) of background material. Subsequent larger sizes must use 0.80 m² (1240 in²).

National Work Zone Awareness Week, Go Orange Day

National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) is an annual nationwide event that promotes the importance of work zone safety by bringing together the American Traffic Safety Services Association (ATSSA), public agencies, national roadway safety organizations, companies, and individuals.

One of the key events during NWZAW is Go Orange Day, which is when individuals wear orange to support work zone safety initiatives. This day raises awareness and honors those impacted by work zone traffic incidents, underscoring the need for continued vigilance and preventative measures. This last Wednesday, the Liberty Safety team was proud to show our support for work zone safety. Join us in raising awareness for #GoOrangeDay and Share this Post with a Friend.

Choosing the Right HVSA for the Job

Selecting the right HVSA involves assessing the work environment and its potential hazards.

The chart above is a general guide to help you determine the appropriate HVSA based on performance class and type. For personalized guidance and support, contact a Liberty Safety Representative to connect with one of our product experts and ensure workforce safety.

April Product Promo

Gear up your workforce with HVSA to ensure their well-being on the job. Explore our April Product Promo featuring workwear essentials to keep your workforce visible and safe.

Conclusion

As we navigate hazardous work environments, prioritizing safety remains paramount. High-visibility safety Apparel (HVSA) is a critical safeguard against accidents and injuries, particularly in settings where visibility is compromised. By adhering to industry standards, commemorating initiatives like Go Orange Day, and investing in quality HVSA, we can foster a culture of safety and protect workers’ well-being.

Your Safety is our priority. It’s all part of our Freedom in Full Gear Promise!

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Mastering Workplace Safety: Your Guide to Puncture-Resistant Work Gloves

Workplace safety is paramount, and equipping your team with the proper PPE is pivotal when preventing common hand injuries such as punctures. These hazards can range from thick wood splinters to fine single-wire strands. 

According to the Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S), 7% of acute hand injuries are attributed to punctures. Additionally, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that punctures incur an average cost of $47,703 per year per incident. Read on to learn more about puncture-resistant work gloves and ensure the safety of your workforce on the job.

What are Puncture Resistant Work Gloves?

Puncture-resistant work gloves are personalized protective equipment (PPE) designed to safeguard against puncture hazards in diverse workplaces. These gloves are constructed with materials that resist penetration from sharp objects, such as nails, shards of glass, metal, and other pointed items.

These gloves are commonly used in construction, manufacturing, automotive, metalworking, and more. It’s important to note that puncture-resistant gloves are distinct from cut-resistant gloves, which are designed to protect against sharp edges and blades rather than puncture threats.

Understanding Puncture Wounds:

A puncture wound is an injury caused by sharp, pointed objects that penetrate the skin and underlying tissues. Unlike cuts or scrapes, puncture wounds are characterized by their deeper and narrower nature. Many cuts and lacerations originate from punctures, underscoring the need to select the correct glove based on the hazards the job presents.

Navigating Industry Standards: Puncture and Needlestick Protection

Manufacturers typically focus on two primary puncture hazards: blunt punctures and needlestick punctures. Both the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the European Standard (EN 388) utilize a similar testing methodology to assess puncture resistance, specifically concerning blunt punctures.

The testing method targets potential puncture threats from larger objects such as nails and staples by using a standardized 4.5mm diameter steel probe featuring a rounded point, moving at a 100mm/min fixed speed. The testing machine records the maximum force exerted on the probe to penetrate the material fully. This test is repeated 12 times on the material to obtain an average measurement. Results are expressed in Newtons and converted into a 1-4 scale for EN388 and a 1-5 scale for ANSI/ISEA 105.

The following chart outlines these puncture resistance levels:

LevelANSI/ISEA 105-2016EN 388:2016
110-19 N20-59 N
220-59 N60-99 N
360-99 N100-149 N
4100-149 N150+ N
5150+ N

It’s crucial to note that not all puncture threats come in the same shapes or sizes.  A common misconception in the workplace is assuming that a glove with a high puncture level is also rated for needle resistance. To address this, the ASTMF2878-10 standard introduced by ANSI specifically tests for needlestick punctures.

This testing method employs a 25-gauge steel needle moving at a 500 mm/min speed. The testing machine records the maximum force required to penetrate the material, with results given in Newtons and then converted into a 0-5 scale, as illustrated in the chart below:

LevelASTM F2878-10
0< 2 N
1≥ 2 N
2≥ 4 N
3≥ 6 N
4≥ 8 N
5≥ 10 N

Exploring the Different Puncture-Resistant Glove Materials

Not all puncture-resistant gloves are created equal. These gloves can come in various materials depending on your specific needs. Here are some of these materials and their respective benefits and disadvantages.

  1. Leather
    • Leather is a commonly used material in glove manufacturing and is known for its effectiveness in blunt puncture resistance. However, it provides limited defense against needlestick punctures.
  2. Nitrile
    • Disposable nitrile gloves, widely used in medical, dental, and food preparation settings, offer excellent resistance to punctures and abrasions. They are particularly effective for one-time use hand protection.
  3. Metal Mesh
    • Gloves made from metal mesh are effective against both needlestick and blunt punctures. However, they face challenges such as degradation over time, resulting in decreased protection. Additionally, they may not be the most comfortable to wear.
  4. Woven Kevlar®
    • A popular choice in various industries, woven Kevlar® stands out for its excellent puncture and cut resistance. Different weave patterns provide varying levels of protection.
  5. Epoxy Plates
    • Epoxy plates offer high cut and puncture protection levels, creating a multi-layered defense against needlestick and blunt punctures.

Choosing the Right Puncture-Resistant Glove:

Many options are available for puncture-resistant materials. However, it’s important to note that no single material or glove can guarantee protection against all puncture-related hazards. Selecting the right puncture-resistant glove involves considering the task at hand and the potential hazards of the job.

The charts above serve as a general guide to help you make this determination. For personalized guidance and support, reach out to a Liberty Safety representative to get connected to one of our product experts and help ensure workforce safety.

March Product Promo:

Gear up for a safe March with our monthly product promo showcasing items designed to protect your workforce from puncture-related hazards. Explore the features that set these gloves apart. 

View the full promo here

Your Safety is our priority. It’s all part of our Freedom in Full Gear Promise!

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Built For Impact: A Comprehensive Guide to Impact-Resistant Gloves

Impact Blog Header

Hand-impact injuries pose unique challenges in treatment and recovery, particularly when any of the hand’s 27 bones are crushed instead of cleanly broken. Beyond bone injuries, these accidents can also harm muscles, tendons, and ligaments (ohsonline.com).

The Occupational Health & Safety (OH&S) states that 42% of acute hand injuries are attributed to impacts. This underscores the importance of selecting the appropriate impact gloves tailored to the specific work task.

What are Impact-Resistant Gloves?

Impact-resistant Gloves are essential personal protective equipment (PPE) designed to prevent occupational hand injuries. These injuries often occur in environments where there’s a high risk of hand trauma from collisions with machinery, heavy equipment, or similar hazards. Reinforcement across the back of the hand, often using Thermoplastic Rubber (TPR), adds an extra layer of defense with a tread design for added protection.

What causes a Hand-Impact Injury?

A hand-impact injury occurs when an object strikes or pinches a hand, transferring force from the object to the hand. The intensity of this force results in a shift or displacement of skin, bones, and muscles, leading to injuries such as lacerations, bone fractures, and bruises.

Understanding the ANSI/ISEA 138-2019 Industry Standard:

The ANSI/ISEA 138-2019 standard, established by the American National Standard Institute, outlines the minimum performance, classification, and labeling requirements for gloves designed to protect the knuckles and fingers/thumb from impact. The standard classifies impact resistance into three performance levels: level 1, 2, and 3, with level 3 offering the highest level of protection.

The classification is achieved by dropping a ‘drop striker’ on the glove’s impact points, recording the force transferred in kilonewtons (kN). The tests are conducted on each knuckle, finger, and thumb. The knuckles are tested four times, while the fingers and thumbs are tested five times.

The chart below illustrates all impact levels, ranging from Level 1 to Level 3, helping workers choose gloves based on their specific needs.

How Impact-Resistant Glove Materials Safeguard Against Injuries:

To mitigate impact injuries, the key lies in extending the duration over which the impact occurs. This prevents the hand from absorbing the entire impact at once. The primary way to achieve this is through deformation.

Deformation, the impact-resistant material’s ability to temporarily change shape, slows the impact force transferred to the hands. This is achieved by integrating impact-resistant back-of-hand materials, often referred to as bumpers. Bumpers aim to optimize deformation so the impact force is slowed as much as possible.

TPR stands out as a widely used material for impact protection. It possesses shock-absorbing properties and is highly durable for bending, stretching, and moving. This ensures workers maintain a comfortable range of motion while being shielded from impacts. TPR’s versatility extends to performing well in cold and hot working environments.

Choosing the Right Impact-Resistant Glove:

Selecting the right impact-resistant glove involves considering the task at hand and the potential hazards of the job. The chart above serves as a general guide to help you make this determination. For personalized guidance and support, reach out to a Liberty Safety representative to get connected to one of our product experts.

February Product Promo:

Gear up for a safe February with our monthly product promo featuring highlighted items from our impact-resistant gloves line. Explore the features that set these gloves apart. 

🔍 View the full promo here

🔍 Request a Personalized Quote

Your Safety is our priority. It’s all part of our Freedom in Full Gear Promise!

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Elevating Workplace Safety: Your Guide to Cut-Resistant Work Gloves

Cuts and lacerations are common workplace injuries. According to data from the Ohio Bureau of Workers’ Compensation, approximately 30% of all workplace injuries fall under this category, with a staggering 70% of these incidents affecting the hands or fingers. One crucial step in addressing these hazards is selecting gloves that meet or exceed the appropriate cut level for a specific work task. Read on to learn more about cut-resistant work gloves and ensure the safety of your workforce on the job.

What Are Cut-Resistant Gloves?

Cut-resistant gloves play a crucial role as Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for workers across diverse industries such as manufacturing, automotive, construction, or other environments where cut protection is paramount. These gloves are designed to protect workers from common workplace hazards including cuts, lacerations, abrasions, and other injuries that can hinder job performance.

Cut-resistant gloves are textile products specially engineered to protect against direct contact with sharp surfaces. Manufacturers design them with the capacity to withstand cutting and slashing, minimizing the wearer’s risk of accidents and severe injury.

The Significance of Cut-Resistant Gloves

Beyond the immediate physical protection they offer, cut-resistant gloves play a vital role in maintaining the overall health of your workforce. Cuts pose a significant risk of exposing the injured employee to blood-borne pathogens, infections, or diseases. Apart from the initial laceration and potential exposure to further issues, the injured employee may endure ongoing health complications, resulting in costly consequences.

According to the National Safety Council, a hand injury can cost anywhere from $540 to $26,000 and injuries to the hand are the second most common type of workplace injury. This makes a big impact on workers’ compensation claims, emphasizing the importance cut-resistant gloves have on mitigating long-term health and financial risks.

Exploring the Different Cut-Resistant Glove Materials

Not all cut-resistant gloves are created equal. These gloves can come in various materials depending on your specific needs. Here are some of these materials along with their respective benefits and disadvantages.

  • Aramid or DuPontTM Kevlar®

Kevlar® is the trademarked brand name for the aramid fiber made by DuPontTM, its name is synonymous with the term aramid. Kevlar is one of the strongest man-made fibers available with excellent cut protection and heat insulation. It is designed to protect hands from the sharp edges of metals, ceramics, glass, and other materials. Pound for pound it is five times stronger than stainless steel.

  • High Performance Polyethylene (HPPE)

HPPE fibers are specially designed to protect against cuts and abrasions when handling sharp and abrasive objects. These fibers can be engineered in a variety of composite-knit yarns, some featuring high-strength composite fiber blends for higher cut resistance and dexterity. 

  • All-Metal Chainmail

While less common, metal can be used as the sole material in manufacturing cut-resistant gloves. Referred to as chainmail gloves, these gloves are made of metal rings linked together in a pattern to form a mesh. These gloves provide a high level of cut resistance, but significantly limit the user’s range of motion.

  • Basalt

Basalt fiber, extracted from crushed basalt rock, offers fine continuous filaments with superior strength characteristics. It is naturally fire-resistant and provides high cut resistance, tensile strength, and good abrasion resistance.

  • Glass Fiber

Glass fiber is a well-known yarn for cut-resistant gloves, offering a smooth and silky surface for enhanced comfort. It can be used as the sole component for cut resistance or to reinforce other fibers, providing high tensile strength, cut resistance, fire resistance, water resistance, and non-conductivity.

Understanding Cut Levels

Cut-resistant gloves vary in their resistance and strength. The higher the cut level, the more heavy-duty and cut-resistant the glove is. The ANSI/ISEA 105-2016 standard, established by the American National Standard Institute, utilizes a nine-level scale, which provides a quick guide for identifying the appropriate cut-resistant gloves required for the specific hazard faced.

This standard assesses cut resistance on a scale from 0 to 6,000 grams, based on tests by a Tomodynamometer (TDM Method), which moves a blade across the material being tested. The weight required to cut the material determines the level of cut resistance. A higher rating on the scale translates to better protection and cut performance.

The chart below illustrates all nine cut levels, ranging from A2 to A9.

Choosing the Right Cut-Resistant Glove

When determining the right cut-resistant glove for you, it’s essential to consider the task at hand and the potential hazards that the task presents. The chart above serves as a general guide to help you in making this determination. For personalized guidance and support, reach out to a Liberty Safety representative to get connected to one of our product experts.

January Product Promo

Start the New Year with savings! Explore our January Product Promo, featuring highlighted items from our cut-resistant gloves line. Dive into the unique features that set these gloves apart.

➡️ View the full promo here

➡️ Request A Personalized Quote

Your safety is our priority. It’s all part of our Freedom in Full Gear promise!